Jennifer Arlem Molina | Artist Statement
16020
page-template-default,page,page-id-16020,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,vertical_menu_enabled, vertical_menu_transparency vertical_menu_transparency_on,qode-title-hidden,side_area_uncovered_from_content,qode-theme-ver-10.1.1,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.0.1,vc_responsive

As an artist I aim to create experiences. I choose to collaborate with my subjects, my surroundings and materials rather than control them. My work is a representation of my growth, not only as an artist but as a woman. Every piece is full of movement; both physical and emotional, as well as energy and color. With this approach I aim to create work that becomes a representation of not only myself but of my environment. My work is social commentary acting as a catalyst for the open exchange of thoughts and ideas.

I frequently reference my childhood experiences as a source of inspiration.

Born and raised in one of the most artistically collaborative cities in Mexico, I am no stranger to distinctive forms of art. Because of the amount of European influence, brought by German Immigrants, Mazatlan, Mexico is filled with traditional German,traditional Mexican, and combinations of the two that cover the city. All of these was then complemented by my grandmother who enriched my life with her encouragement in the arts, dancing, painting, and writing.

At the age of 12, my life was then again enriched with the American experience of immigration. Cultural immersion is always accompanied with culture shock; but, I somehow evaded the latter by becoming culturally intrigued in my new home, the culturally progressive Seattle, Washington. At the age of 16th, my mother provided me with the opportunity to study in Paris. It was there where I developed a love for art history and became intrigued and fell in love with the work of Pablo Picasso, Mark Rothko and Jean-Michael Basquiat.

Growing up in Seattle, I struggled over how to answer to people who expected me to know everything about my birthplace. I did not have that huge connection I was supposed to have. Sometimes, I felt like a tourist in my own ethnicity. In 2006 after being exposed to the work of Manuel Alvarez Bravo, I was inspired to learn more about photography as an art, which led me to create a documentary about the daily life in my city of birth.

I believe simple experiences can make us feel more connected to the world. Therefore, I carefully select and visually interpret my ideas so the essence is revealed and captured in a single moment. I prefer to work project based, rather than to allow the medium to control my thought process. My artwork is a social commentary acting as a catalyst for the open exchange of thoughts and ideas.